Sunscreen Nanoparticles May Cause Skin Cancer

As reported by David Gutierrez, staff writer NaturalNews.com (10/10) ...Sunscreens made with nanoparticles may cause serious bodily harm, a report from Friends of the Earth has warned. "Consumers need to know that manufactured nanoscale zinc and titanium oxides are not the only choice and are not necessarily the most effective or safest choice for sun protection," the report reads.

Many sunscreens now contain nanoscale particles of titanium dioxide or zinc oxide, roughly 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. The only reason for using nanotechnology is to make the sunscreens less oily and easier to rub into the skin. Although titanium dioxide and zinc oxide have long been used in sunscreens and are considered relatively safe, the normal rules no longer apply to matter on the nano scale.

In its report, Friends of the Earth cites six recent studies indicating that zinc oxide nanoparticles can penetrate healthy human skin to reach the blood and urine, kill brain stem cells in mice, and destroy colon cells in even minute concentrations. They also cite studies finding that nanoscale titanium dioxide can produce gene changes in pregnant mice and has been linked to Alzheimer's, autism and epilepsy. All nanoparticles are also capable of crossing the placental barrier between mother and fetus.

Although a number of European governments have begun passing regulations mandating labeling, testing and even bans on some nanoparticles, particularly in cosmetics, the industry remains completely unregulated in the United States. "Nanosunscreens have the potential to cause serious human and environmental harm, but there is nothing stopping companies from selling them," the report says.

To make matters worse, a recent report by the Consumers Union found that even among sunscreens claiming to be nano-free, 80 percent still contained nanoparticles. "These nanomaterials are being added without appropriate labeling or reliable safety information, so the public has no way of making informed purchasing choices," said Ian Illuminato, senior health researcher for Friends of the Earth. Unfortunately for consumers seeking to protect their health, the majority of sunscreens not made with titanium or zinc oxides are also made with known carcinogens.

more on sunscreen dangers:


Are You Allergic To Sunscreen?

As reported by ScienceDaily (10/10) So That's Why We're Allergic to Sun Creams

What happens to sunscreens when they are exposed to sunlight? And how is the skin affected by the degradation products that form? This has been the subject of research at the University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University of Technology that will be presented at the upcoming dermatologist conference in Gothenburg.

A growing hole in the ozone layer and a change in sunbathing habits have brought an increase in the number of cases of skin cancer worldwide. One way of dealing with this has been to advocate sunscreens, though greater use of these products has triggered an increase in contact allergy and photocontact allergy to sun protection products. "We know that sun creams pass through the skin into our bodies, but we don't know what effects they have on us," says Isabella Karlsson, doctoral student at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Gothenburg's Faculty of Science. "Many of them actually break down in the presence of sunlight. We therefore wanted to look at what can happen to the chemical sun protection agents when exposed to UV rays, and how the degradation products that form affect the skin."

In their study, the researchers have come up with an explanation of what happens during this process. "Arylglyoxales, one of the degradation products, turned out to be highly allergenic," says Karlsson. "Which could explain why some people are allergic to creams that contain dibenzoylmethanes, one of the UVA-absorbing substances in sun creams." This has made for a better understanding of the mechanism behind photocontact allergy, which could lead to a product that does not cause allergy, and could determine which sun creams people are most likely to be sensitive to.

But their discovery is already having an impact. The healthcare system has long found it difficult to test patients with suspected photocontact allergy, but thanks to the study a new test is being developed. "We're just starting to work with various dermatology clinics on assessing the test," explains Karlsson. "So more patients will be able to find out whether they have photocontact allergy, which could help them in their everyday lives and reduce the burden on the healthcare system."  

related articles:

Services
Information
Tan Plus Products
Essentials Products
News
Disclaimer

Tanning & Natural Health News is a publication of Tan Plus /Essentials Of Life, Barclay Square, 350 Route 108, Somersworth, NH. This publication is designed for educational purposes only and is not intended to be presented as medical advice. Product statements made have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration.

Copyright © 2010-2014 • Ray Allard • All Rights Reserved

 Experience “Real Health” Naturally
Tanning & Natural Health News
Essentials.png
sun.gif
TANPlus
 Experience “Real Health” Naturally
Tanning & Natural Health News
Essentials.png
sun.gif
TANPlus